Moroccan Tagines – March 2015

March is for Moroccan!

Tagines are a great meal to make for those still blustery nights in March, or any time you want a warm, delicious, and easy stew.  A tagine dish is a traditional Moroccan clay pot, but you can use any stock pot or dutch oven to create the flavorful dish. A tagine stew (the food made in the traditional clay dish) is basically a blend of traditional Moroccan spices such as; smoked paprika, ginger, cumin, turmeric, cinnamon, and meat, typically chicken or lamb, and vegetables. Olives, preserved lemons, carrots, raisins, and aprictos are all popular, but you can pick and choose your preferences in assembling your own custom tagine. Tagines are easy to make, but do take several hours. For most Sunday Suppers, I make two tagines; one classic chicken with olives and lemon, and one with lamb.

1. Begin by blending roughly equal amounts of each of the spices together in a large bowl.

Photo: Sunday Supper

Photo: Sunday Supper

2. Mix the spice blend with some olive oil to form a paste, the basis of the sauce.

Photo: Sunday Supper

Photo: Sunday Supper

3. Marinate the cut up pieces of meat in the blend.

Photo: Sunday Supper

Photo: Sunday Supper

4. Brown the meat in a pan.

Photo: Sunday Supper

Photo: Sunday Supper

5. Add the meat, and any remaining sauce to a stock pot.

6. Add chicken stock (or vegetable stock or water if that is your preference) and boil together. Wash and chop your vegetables, and set aside.

7. After bringing the meat and stock to a boil, turn the flame down and add the vegetables into the pot. Leave the pot to simmer for several hours.

Photo: Sunday Supper

Photo: Sunday Supper

8. Check on it after a few hours to see if you may want to add more liquid.  It can be left simmering overnight, and frankly I think it tastes even better on the second day.

9. Add a side of cous cous and serve!

Photo: Sunday Supper

Photo: Sunday Supper

Herbed Salmon Fillets – January 2015

Photo: Sunday Supper

Photo: Sunday Supper

Equally lovely for a party, or an easy weeknight meal, these herbed salmon fillets are healthy and super easy to make. This recipe can be made for one to thirty people, or even more! We generally recommend planning for one fillet per person.

1. With the skin on the bottom, place your fillets of salmon in a deep roasting pan.  Leave some room around each piece, making sure they are not too crowded.

2. Pour chicken stock into the pan, enough so that the fillets are sitting comfortably in a pool of liquid, without being submerged.

3. Sprinkle with thyme, salt, and pepper. (Or any fresh herbs that you prefer.)

4. Cook in the oven at 325° F for approximately 25 minutes.

Lamb Chops – December 2014

Photo: Sunday Supper

Photo: Sunday Supper

Lamb chops are great to serve for a large crowd at a holiday party because they’re easy to pick up and eat with one hand while standing. (And they basically come already individually portioned.) They’re a huge crowd-pleaser because they’re warm, flavorful, and more substantial than many cocktail party offerings.  They’re also a great option for hosts because they’re easy to make and don’t require flatware or plates. Just lots of napkins! We recommend 1-2 chops per guest.

1. Pre-heat your oven to 350°F. Place all of the lamb chops flat on a baking sheet, making sure not to overcrowd them.

2. Sprinkle salt, pepper, rosemary, a little bit of olive oil, and a bit of balsamic vinegar on both sides of each piece of lamb.

Photo: Sunday Supper

Photo: Sunday Supper

3. Roast for 20 minutes, and then check on the lamb, as it depends on how well-done you prefer your meat. For more well-done meat, cook for between 25-30 minutes total. After removing the lamb from the oven, let it rest briefly before serving.

 

 

Butternut Squash Soup – November 2014

Photo: Sunday Supper

Photo: Sunday Supper

Butternut squash is an excellent source of antioxidants, fiber, and beta-carotene. Most importantly, it’s delicious, and our (mostly) healthy soup recipe is a great way to bring its rich fall flavor to your table. The soup is filling and creamy in texture without any actual cream, which helps to keep it healthy. This recipe is super easy to make, but does take several hours of roasting and simmering time. It makes four servings, but can easily be expanded for a bigger crowd.

1. Using one large chopped and peeled butternut squash, or two packages of 20 oz. each of pre-cut squash chunks, spread the butternut squash on a baking sheet and drizzle with olive oil.  Optional: sprinkle brown sugar on top. Bake at 400°F for forty–five minutes.

Photo: Sunday Supper

Photo: Sunday Supper

2. Meanwhile, chop ½ of a white onion, and one clove of garlic.

3. In a large stockpot on the stovetop, heat half a stick of butter and 1 Tbsp. of olive oil. Add in the chopped onions and garlic, and cook for several minutes.

4. When ready, remove the chunks of butternut squash from the oven and add them to your stock pot. Purée them using a plunge mixer in the stock pot, or by transferring them into a food processor and then into the stock pot.

5. Add in one box of chicken stock, or approximately 32 oz. (Vegetable stock can be substituted if preferred)

Photo: Sunday Supper

Photo: Sunday Supper

6. Add 1 Tsp. maple syrup, and a few sprinkles each of salt, pepper, celery salt, nutmeg, cinnamon, and clove. Turn the heat down to a low flame, cover, and let cook for two hours, stirring occasionally. You can adjust the consistency to your taste, adding either a little more chicken stock, or a little bit of a thickener like Wondra.

Photo: Sunday Supper

Photo: Sunday Supper

Photo: Sunday Supper

7. Serve as is, or with freshly chopped scallions and chives, crispy pieces of bacon, or pieces of whole-wheat toast croutons on top if desired.

8. Any leftover soup can be frozen and enjoyed on a cold day later in the season.

Photo: Sunday Supper

Photo: Sunday Supper

 

 

Montauk Picks – August 2014

Sunset at The Crow's Nest Photo: Sunday Supper

Sunset at The Crow’s Nest
Photo: Sunday Supper

Montauk, New York is a great end of summer getaway, or even a nice drive for dinner if you’re based not too far away. But it’s even better if you can still get away for a late summer weekend in September when most of the crowds will be gone, and the ocean will be at its warmest. This low-key town, famous for its surfing, has lots of great restaurants and terrific fresh, local seafood. Here we’ve picked just a few of our favorite places:

Anthony’s Pancake and Waffle House is a classic little diner that has been in Montauk for more than sixty years, and it’s the best place to get eggs and of course, some old-school chocolate chip pancakes.  It’s right in the center of  town, so take a stroll to check out the farmer’s market and the shops after eating there.

Photo: Sunday Supper

Photo: Sunday Supper

The Crow’s Nest is a great place to go for dinner while you watch the sunset at the camp-like setting. Then stay for drinks by the lake and a have a seat around the campfire. In addition to the restaurant, The Crow’s Nest is also a lovely inn with the perfect blend of high-end and rustic decor, and we love staying there.

Photo: Sunday Supper

Photo: Sunday Supper

Gosman’s is the go-to fave for a classic lobster dinner. Everyone wears a bib while ripping apart their whole lobsters. It’s a great place to bring the whole family or a group of friends.

Photo: Sunday Supper

Photo: Sunday Supper

Fudge “N” Stuff is a charming little candy shop with ice cream, and of course, its own delicious homemade fudge. Like a lot of things in Montauk, it feels like it’s been there forever. You definitely need to stop by and try a square of one of the many flavors of fudge…

Photo: Sunday Supper

Photo: Sunday Supper